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20120925
20121003
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
is that they lost the summer, the romney campaign. if you look at obama did, they did, at the start of this race was in may. that's when they started going out with tough ads and framing romney as someone who wasn't in touch with the middle class and the tax issue, him releasing his tax returns. he was always on the defensive and now he has a lot of ground to make up. gwen: is there an argument to be made that there is a policy shift going on in america's mind as well, not just a good speech or a good piece of positioning, but actually people are looking at their choices differently now? >> there are ways to think of this, not just through polling data but economic data and there is a surge of optimism. small business confidence is up. some financial market participant indexes are up. this would suggest that people are starting to feel better about this recovery. a lot of interesting questions as to why because the data don't support that. we have been having a slow recovery for three years now and people have gotten used to it. it is like a lukewarm bath. any drop of hot water, you think it wil
, kentucky. heading into the series, the latest polls show that nationally the obama-romney race is still close. but the president is moving ahead in most of the battle ground states. to get a sense of where the race stands, and what each campaign believes the candidates must do in those debates, we're joined by our regular duo, stuart rothenberg of the "rothenberg political report" and "roll call," and susan page, washington bureau chief of "u.s.a. today." welcome back to both of you. >> good to be here. woodruff: we just reported again, stu, nationally the race looks pretty close but in the battle ground states the president seems to have lead. what do you make of all that? >> that's exactly the case. national numbers show obama leadingy two to four points. some polls have it it a little bit more. it's in the swing states particularly critical ohio where the obama lead appears to be four- to eight-points, something in that range. there are two possible regulations. one is state-specific factors that are affecting voters in those states. for example, in virginia and ohio, a better-than-a
. the problem is, it isn't a 1980s situation. the theory going into the race on the romney side is he has to show up and reassure people. that's what his whole convention was about. he has a much higher bar than that. he needs to convince people that his program is a better answer for the country. that's what he has to do. it's not going to be easy to do because there's going to be lots of distractions coming at him and the president himself is quite an adept debater. >> he had clinton at the convention. >> that comes down to the two theories of the race. one was right, one was wrong. the romney theory, tell ople it's okay even though the president's a nice guy to vote against him because everyone's primed to vote against him. the democrats went into the convention realizing they needed to make a substantive case and tear down romney's agenda. romney needs to build that up again. >> have you everybody observed, mortimer, how -- have you observed, mortimer, how much the president relies on a teleprompter and of course romney probably less so? but he's been out there in the field. obama rea
program are damaging the economy. now to the presidential race here in the u.s. and both mitt romney and barack obama are busy swatting up and rehearsing for the first television debate this wednesday. polls show the republican candidate is trailing president obama in the crucial swing states. one of them is of course ohio where early voting gets under way tomorrow. from there our north america editor reports. >> ♪ the boys are back in town ♪ >> the boys are indeed back in town yet again. they call this the buckeye state for the men who are fighting for the white house it's a state to suck up to, whether it's buying the local produce. >> i'm thinking we are going to be eating some corn over the weekend. >> or urging minors to phone a friend. >> want you to find one person to convince to vote for our ticket. >> both candidates are well aware in the last election in the last 44 years ohio has voted for the winning candidate so the politicians woo voters. >> we can create one million new manufacturing jobs in the next four years with the right policies. that's what i'm fighting for
which the romney campaign didn't do, it's still almost a tied race. we've seen the race shift just a bit in obama's direction but it's not as though it's a run-away race on either side. >> woodruff: here we are 42, 4 days out. susan, is what you think almost a tied race? >> i think it's actually... it's been a tied race a very close race for so long i do think in the past two weeks we've seen it move just bit in president obama's direction especially in some of these swing states like ohio and iowa and new hampshire and virginia. we have statewide polls that show not a big edge for president obama but a pretty consistent one for him. you know, there's a history to this. in the last 15 elections, the candidate who is ahead at the point has won the popular vote every time. at this point, president obama has a narrow national lead but a national lead. >> woodruff: how do you see it? i agree. i think we went from a jump ball three weeks now to a slight advantage for the president. i really think it's coming out of the convention. the democrats got a very small bump among a very little sliver
early in the polls. if it appears mitt romney is falling behind in this race. >> woodruff: lauren ashburn, howard kurtz, thank you both very much. and howard and lauren will be back next week the day after the first presidential debate to discuss how it played out in social media. >> brown: finally tonight: the nfl and its referees end a much-maligned lockout. >> jennings and tate, who has it? touchdown! >> brown: it may be the first labor dispute resolved by a touchdown. or what most fans and even one referee saw as an interception. nfl owners and the league's 121 official referees reached a new deal late last night, just two days after a national uproar following monday night's game between the green bay packers and the seattle seahawks. >> touchdown >> brown: the blown call capped weeks of growing frustration over what many saw as the inconsistency and even incompetence of replacement referees. several nfl coaches, including bill bellichcik of the new england patriots, were fined for blasts at and behavior toward the temporary refs and how they managed games. today, nfl commiss
over a month to go before election day, the public has a lot to learn about the 2012 presidential race. among its findings, only 51% know the romney-ryan plan would preserve traditional medicare for those 55 and older and retain it as an option for those now younger than that. only about half knew that mitt romney would keep the bush tax cuts in place. fewer than half knew that romney and not obama had promised to increase defense spending. only 23% were aware that payroll taxes had decreased during obama's term in office. only slightly more than half knew that paul ryan is the republican vice presidential nominee. the director of the annenberg center, kathleen hall jamieson, our master media decoder is back with us. welcome. >> thank you. >> so who's responsible for the widespread unawareness or ignorance that you report in your survey? is it the candidate, the media, or the voter? >> it's all three. and fortunately, we have the opportunity with presidential debates to do something that reliably increases knowledge. we've been studying presidential debates for a long time as a scholar
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)